• Don't fast track Te Waikoropupū!
    Te Waikoropupū Springs have some of the clearest water ever measured on earth. Last year the Springs received a Water Conservation Order (WCO) from the Environment Court. The WCO gives a special cloak of protection that which councils must abide by when considering resource consents.    Yet if the Fast Track Approvals Bill were to pass into law the way it is written, the Government would be able to bypass the protections the WCO gives Te Waikoropupū Springs.    We have also become aware that Siren Gold Mining has been invited to fast track an application to mine in the Golden Bay area under Sam’s Creek.     Sam’s Creek Mine is essentially an arsenic mine. Up to eleven million tonnes of arsenic-laden rock will be mined. The processing of the rock will most likely happen at a plant to be developed on farmland in the Upper Takaka Valley. Arsenic-laden rock will be pounded to a fine powder and passed into a slime heap containing cyanide and other chemicals. The ore's high arsenic content would leave over 75,000 tonnes of highly toxic substance in the slime heap once the gold is removed.    If the slime heap were to leak into the aquifer, as is likely to happen over time, it would mean the stygofauna in the aquifer would die and the crystal-clear waters be lost forever.    The Save Our Springs Campaign was formed to protect Te Waikoropupu Springs. Thousands of people have worked over many years to protect the precious taonga that is Te Waikoropupū Springs. We are still planning to deliver our 17,000 strong petition to Save Te Waikoropupū Springs from the threat of synthetic nitrogen.    We must draw a line and speak up before the Fast Track Bill becomes law. Unless there are changes all 16 Water Conservation Orders around the country will be threatened.    Sign our urgent petition to save te Waikoropupū from the fast tracked gold mine! Help us stop the Fast-Track being the death trap for Te Waikoropupū.     Links:  Fast track: What’s the story? Greenpeace, March 2024 Waikoropupū Springs water conservation order, Ministry for the Environment  Maps: Te Waikoropupū Springs  
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    Created by Kevin Moran
  • Stop the Spence Road Quarry
    The Waitawheta is a beautiful river starting in bush, and close to Auckland and other main centres. It’s one of the cleanest rivers on the North Island which provides the water town supply for Paeroa. The proposed new quarry area has Significant Natural Area (SNA) status. As an SNA it is an area of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna. We are very concerned there will be serious risk to water quality and environmental damage if the quarry goes ahead. There are at least four rare and threatened species that live in the area including the Long tailed bat, Hochstetter’s frog, Te Aroha stag beetle, and Striped skink. The area is home to numerous native birds including Kaka and New Zealand Falcon, Karearea. The Waitawheta River has a macroinvertebrate community index (MCI) of 134. This means it is one of the cleanest rivers in New Zealand and a reason it also makes it a recognised fishery for Rainbow and German Brown trout. The new quarry is likely to affect water quality in the river from run off in extreme weather events, which are becoming more common. This would add sediment silt and debris coming from the quarry into the river. Blasting can also affect water flows. Blasting and crushing can cause emission of noxious gases, air pollution and ground vibration. These can cause health problems in local communities and damage to houses and structures in the surrounding communities. This project has far reaching effects on the local environment and the wider community. At the least everyone should be made aware of this project and be allowed to make submissions to both the Hauraki District Council and the Waikato Regional Council. With the current state of rivers in New Zealand maintaining the highest quality of water in this river should be a top priority. We are local residents in the Waitawheta valley area who are very concerned about the proposed new quarry. If you also care about protecting rivers and our natural ecosystems in Waikato please sign the petition! https://www.valleyprofile.co.nz/2023/11/21/neighbours-say-quarry-proposal-brings-fight-to-our-side/
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    Created by Steven Erickson
  • ECan Protect Hector's Dolphins through your Regional Plan
    Upokohue/ Hector's dolphins are one of the rarest marine dolphins in the world. Their greatest concentrations are found on the west and east coasts of the South Island and have the conservation status of ‘nationally vulnerable’. Hector's dolphins are threatened by many human activities. No dolphins should die as a result of fishing related practices. Yet fishing impacts have been devastating for the species. Dolphins continue to be killed in trawl nets. The rules around bycatch - and fishing near shore, are too weak. The fishing boat Austro Carina grounded recently off Banks Peninsula and is leaking oil, threatening wildlife (Oct 2023). It was legally fishing within endangered Hector's habitat, less than 2m from shore, which shows it's not just direct fishing risks that threaten Hector's habitat, but indirect fishing activities too. A small population of Hector’s lives in Lyttelton Harbour and is already threatened by industrial activities, noise and massive cruise ships. The competitive boat race SailGP also occurs in the dolphin habitat, and tourism also impacts on the dolphins. 🐬 Environment Canterbury can fix this, and it must. We call on ECan to protect Hector's from fishing related impacts through the Council's Regional Plan.
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    Created by Christine Rose
  • Stop Fukushima radioactive waste water dump into the Pacific
    Japan is preparing to dump about 1.3 million tonnes of contaminated water into the Pacific over the next three to four decades. It claims this would be made safe through an Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS) and then dilution, but the water will still be radioactive. The dump of contaminated water is part of the effort to decommission the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, 12 years after it was overwhelmed by a tsunami. International laws are clear that States cannot undertake activities in their own waters that will have harmful effects in the high seas. There is no question that releasing radioactivity is contaminating the high seas. By not challenging the move, Pacific leaders, including New Zealand, could be undermining [1] the objectives of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty, otherwise known as the Rarotonga Treaty. Article Seven of the Rarotonga Treaty[2] places an obligation on states which are signatories to "prevent dumping" in light of the legacy of nuclear weapons testing in the region. Ocean currents experts are predicting the waste would sweep right across the Pacific. Nations in the Asia Pacific region, led by the Pacific Island Forum, have strongly voiced their opposition to the plans.[3] Some of the world’s leading oceanographic institutes and marine scientists have criticised the weakness of the scientific justification[4] applied by TEPCO, the owner of the nuclear plant, warned against using the Pacific Ocean as a dumping ground for radioactive contaminated water, and called for alternatives to discharge to be applied. Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) secretary general Henry Puna has said that the release poses major impacts and long-term worry for Pacific Island states who should not have to bear another nuclear testing activity. Greenpeace International says [5] “The Japanese government is desperate for international endorsement for its Pacific Ocean radioactive water dump plans. It has failed to protect its own citizens, including the vulnerable fishing communities of Fukushima, as well as nations across the wider Asia Pacific region. The aftermath of the nuclear disaster at Fukushima is still strongly felt, and the Japanese government has failed to fully investigate the effects of discharging multiple radionuclides on marine life. The government is obligated under international law to conduct a comprehensive environmental impact assessment, including the impact of transboundary marine pollution, but has failed to do so. Its plans are a violation of the UN Convention Law of the Sea.” Greenpeace East Asia analysis[6] has detailed the failures of liquid waste processing technology at the Fukushima Daiichi plant and the environmental threats posed by the releases. REFERENCES: Rarotonga Treaty could be 'undermined' if Pacific leaders don't oppose Japan's nuclear dump | RNZ News: https://www.rnz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/492863/rarotonga-treaty-could-be-undermined-if-pacific-leaders-don-t-oppose-japan-s-nuclear-dump Treaty of Rarotonga | NATIONS UNIES: https://www.un.org/nwfz/fr/content/treaty-rarotonga#:~:text=The%20Rarotonga%20Treaty%20also%20includes,radioactive%20matter%20(Article%207) Japan must work with the Pacific to find a solution to the Fukushima water release issue – otherwise we face disaster: https://www.forumsec.org/2023/02/06/op-ed-japan-must-work-with-the-pacific-to-find-a-solution-to-the-fukushima-water-release-issue-otherwise-we-face-disaster/ 2022-12 Position Paper: Release of Radioactively Contaminated Water into the Ocean: https://www.naml.org/policy/documents/2022-12-12%20Position%20Paper,%20Release%20of%20Radioactively%20Contaminated%20Water%20into%20the%20Ocean.pdf Ignoring science, environmental protection and international law – G7 endorses Japan’s Fukushima water discharge plans: https://www.greenpeace.org/international/press-release/59193/science-environmental-protection-international-law-g7-japans-fukushima-water-discharge/ Stemming the Tide 2020: The reality of the Fukushima radioactive water crisis: https://www.greenpeace.org/static/planet4-japan-stateless/2020/10/5e303093-greenpeace_stemmingthetide2020_fukushima_radioactive_water_crisis_en_final.pdf
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  • Say no to The Willow Project!!
    Our planet cannot afford any more major drilling projects due to already out-of-control climate change. Especially due to rising water levels, New Zealand will be subject to drastic effects. This includes more natural disasters, effects on farming industries, and housing. We need to urge US President Joe Biden to decline the Antarctic oil drilling project alongside our international supporters. The ‘Willow Master Development Plan’ is a proposed oil project in Alaska. The 30 year project would extract huge reservoirs of petroleum stored on the Alaskan North Slope. It is said doing so could produce up to 180,000 barrels of oil a day, which is around 1.5 per cent of the total U.S. oil production. Five drilling sites have been proposed by the project builders, ConocoPhillips Alaska. The USA has enough oil to date to meet their country’s need, and extracting more oil for political and business reasons is a selfish and unnecessary step for humanity in the 21st century. The Willow Project could have a devastating impact on the western Arctic, jeopardising indigenous communities, polluting the water supply and air quality, and disrupting animal migration flows through the region. Not to mention the drastic effect it will have on the global supply chain and ecosystem. If this project is approved, many animals including polar bears, seals, arctic birds will be affected. The eco-system is already finely balanced. Climate change could become irreversible. More animals will become endangered and we may not be able to rectify what was done, for at least decades to come. It’s vital we take action - to verbalise our concerns on this matter now will show the huge global concern. The Biden administration has the ability to deny the permits to stop this climate disaster before it starts. We have international and USA supporters who are against this project. It’s time to do our part in saving the planet if we stand up and vocalise our concerns NOW. The Government here has already banned new offshore oil and gas exploration. As we take action in Aotearoa, we have an international role to also support climate action and climate justice everywhere. Every country needs to urgently transition off fossil fuels and ramp up investment in sustainable technologies. It’s so important we care for our planet as we depend on the health of the Earth for our own health. When we all come together as one to support the land and environment that has brought our communities closer, so we can support the next generations for a better future. We urge you to share our concerns so we can have a fighting chance to assist and nurture our planet as she nurtures us. Let’s protect the future for centuries to come! Stop the Willow Project - sign the petition! Find out more: https://apnews.com/article/biden-oil-alaska-willow-conocophillips-d834b0d258e357e976e85f4d59dab19a https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2023/03/01/willow-project-biden-conoco-phillips/
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    Created by Tanya Dewan
  • Stop the Woodstock landfill!
    The Oxford Ohoka area is a pristine back country area close to the foothills of the Southern Alps. The aquifers underneath feed most of the Waimakariri and Christchurch water schemes. Yet this beautiful place is at risk of becoming the dumping ground of toxic waste, soil contaminants, demolition and rubbish. Woodstock Quarries Ltd are applying for five resource consents from ECan and one with Waimakariri District Council (WDC) to expand an existing hard rock quarry and construct a landfill on their quarry site at View Hill. The landfill would take hazardous waste and spread across 12 hectares, with a volume of about 4 million cubic metres. It would accept about 100,000 cubic metres a year of construction and demolition waste including hazardous materials, asbestos, industrial waste and contaminated soil. This proposed landfill will create multiple environmental risks over time. We are very concerned with the possibility of toxic materials leaching into groundwater, sediment runoff, and the risk of the landfill liner failing. With increasingly severe weather there are potential risks from heavy rainfall and high winds spreading dust. We are concerned with the increase in heavy traffic, a proposed extra 20 trucks a day. The Quarry location is 900m from the Ashley fault line, which has been assessed as moderate risk, and no assessment has been made should the Alpine Fault earthquake happen. View Hill is the wrong place entirely for a landfill and the Councils must decline all five consents. Support local residents and sign our petition to stop the landfill! ✍🏼 You can make a submission against the landfill here: https://www.ecan.govt.nz/do-it-online/resource-consents/notifications-and-submissions/notified-consents/woodstock-quarries-limited/ Links https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/130678211/residents-of-small-town-caught-off-guard-by-deadline-for-massive-landfill https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2022/12/residents-from-small-north-canterbury-town-fight-to-save-countryside-from-proposed-landfill.html
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    Created by Tracy Sayer
  • Your water!.. Your future!.. No water!.. No future!
    Water is the very essence of all life without it nothing can survive. Cooperations and overseas investors wish to exhaust our natural resource for capital gain. We cannot drink their money. Our natural springs take many many years to replenish and the threat of a water bottling company will collapse our waterways. Future generations yet to be born will have very little or no water. We must stop this from happening. Aotearoa stand with us the Whanganui community for we are all connected by the water and it is our responsibility to protect our waterways.
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    Created by Te Awhina Hamahona
  • Enact the right to a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment for all
    The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (BORA) protects and promotes human rights and fundamental freedoms in New Zealand. BORA, just like other legislation, can be amended at any time by Parliament. This is why it’s important to make the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment a part of BORA. All laws (current and future) are assessed by the rights confirmed in BORA. Having the right to a “clean, healthy and sustainable environment for all” would prevent the enactment of laws that are inconsistent with that right! A healthy and thriving environment is essential to human life and survival. Yet our Earth’s ecosystems are under threat from human activity, driven by the settings of the economic system and constant economic expansion. In Aotearoa, the environment is under immense pressure from human activities. The Our Marine Environment 2022 report and the Environment Aotearoa 2022 reports show the extent human activities are damaging our marine and land environments. We need to protect and look after the soil, water, flora, fauna and all ecosystems if we are to survive without environmental threats. One way to make this a consistent basis for all our decisions and actions is to acknowledge the basic right of a healthy and clean environment in one of our uncodified constitutional documents. This will absolutely change the way business is done, as the environment is presently sacrificed for commercial “progress”. That needs to change. There will be a process of consultation with iwi and hapū groups, as mana whenua and partners of the Crown under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, before any proposed legislation is put before Parliament. Parliament must make it clear the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment for all is more important than harming our environment for perceived commercial progress. ★ This one law has the potential to transform the way we view the environment in law. Sign the petition to add your power to make it happen! 🌏 Notes Climate change, human activity's alarming impact on marine environment laid bare: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2022/10/climate-change-human-activity-s-alarming-impact-on-marine-environment-laid-bare.html Environment Aotearoa 2022 https://environment.govt.nz/assets/publications/environment-aotearoa-2022.pdf
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    Created by Adnan Ahmed
  • Clean up toxic dump sites on horticultural land
    Old toxic waste dumps are all over New Zealand, including Auckland. Illegal tip sites in Auckland contain contaminants like pesticides, oil from machinery, refrigerants, household waste, old plant equipment etc which is leaking into estuaries then into rivers which flow into the Waitemata and other Auckland harbours. Horticultural sites especially, used and dumped stores of chemicals. Old dumps weren’t necessarily sealed properly and risk leaching into the environment, especially now with more extreme weather events. Auckland has old farms, wineries, and orchards that used toxic chemicals as pesticides and fungicides, in the decades before proper controls. It is important to manage these old dumps to protect our fresh and coastal waters and flora and fauna from contaminated waste leakage. We call on the council to review historic and current horticulture sites in the region, whether still operational or not, and investigate the sites for contaminated waste. This can be done and funded as part of the next Unitary Plan review. Where they find a toxic dump Auckland Council needs to take action. They could do this in a number of ways: 🌱 Urgent remediation of existing sites 🌱 Give the owners an ultimatum to clean it up, or the council/ government will appoint contractors to do the work, at their expense. 🌱 Ask people to report toxic dumps through an anonymous phone line 🌱 Offer a six month grace period for owners of land with private dumps to come forward without penalty There should be penalties for the owners of private dumps who do not disclose contaminated sites on their land. People who buy land in good faith and subsequently discover contamination, should be able to remove the contaminated waste when found, at the cost of the previous owners who passed the problem on, and those people be liable for penalties. Until old dumps are cleaned up then they will sit there doing damage to ecosystems. If they remain on site without people knowing they also risk human health. https://toiteora.govt.nz/public/contaminated-land/ https://www.thomasconsultants.co.nz/what-is-a-contaminated-site/
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    Created by Mark Jensen
  • Public Submission: Save the Denniston Plateau from opencast coal mining
    The Department of Conservation has begun its review and reclassification of the status of its “stewardship land”, starting on the West Coast. This includes the Denniston Plateau, which has already been partially destroyed by the mothballed Bathurst Resources’ Escarpment coal mine. The rest of the plateau is of high conservation value, and it, along with nearby Deep Creek, also contains some of the last unmined coking coal measures in the country, with mining permits held by BT Mining - a company set up by Bathurst Resources and Talley’s. Bathurst recently had to close a coal mine in Canterbury because it had breached so many consents. The coal mining industry wants these areas to be classified “Conservation Park”, which is the current recommendation, but in the words of mining lobby group Minerals West Coast: “Some reclassification categories - such as "conservation park", would still allow for mining under existing legislation.” Right now, the draft classifications for these areas are indeed only for "Conservation Park". The Denniston Plateau contains a unique sandstone plateau and rare wetlands, full of endangered and endemic creatures like our giant snail and the unique Avatar Moth, found nowhere else in the world. Also present are the great spotted kiwi and fern birds, and a rare skink found nowhere else, along with a giant snail. Experience in this part of the world shows us that any claims by a coal company that they will “rehabilitate” the land after mining are empty promises. These unique areas would be destroyed, the streams polluted, and the animals in them gone. The world is moving away from coal. We are in the midst of a climate emergency and we must protect our most precious areas both from the impacts of climate change - and from being dug up for coal that will only increase emissions at a time when we need to reduce them. ⏩ BELOW is the public submission to sign onto: Dear Panel members West Coast, The three areas we are concerned about all sit atop considerable coal measures, coal that if burned would contribute to climate change, at a time when governments around the world are attempting to reduce emissions to get the world onto a 1.5˚C warming pathway. We note the government’s Emission Reduction Plan (ERP) specifically refers to “working with nature” to help reduce emissions as part of solving our climate crisis: “Looking after these forests is one of the most important contributions Aotearoa can make to combating global climate change. We also have a significant opportunity to develop native forests that both act as long-term carbon sinks and support biodiversity…” ★ We therefore strongly recommend a much stronger protection regime for the following areas: 🌏 1. Kaw_10 - Waimangaroa - Granity This area contains Deep Creek, a highly biodiverse area, with coal measures under the land. Given the main habitat of the Powelliphanta augustus was obliterated by the Stockton Mine, and rehabilitation efforts have failed, and the majority of the remainder of this species are still living in fridges, it is absolutely critical to preserve, in perpetuity, this last remaining habitat of this critically endangered species. The very nature of the DOC description: “high ecological values” and “overwhelmingly natural and largely intact” brings into question its lowly recommended classification of Conservation Park. A scientific reserve would preserve this area in perpetuity, especially as it would preclude the area from being stripped bare in an opencast coal mine. We therefore recommend that this be classified as an ecological area (under Part 4, S21 of the Conservation Act) with a scientific reserve on the remainder of the Stockton Plateau (sandstone pavement) including Upper Deep Creek/Whirlwind Creek (under Part 3, S21 of the Reserves Act) 🌏 2. Kaw_17-Mount Rochfort, Old Denniston School Site Again, we consider the recommendation of “Conservation Park” is in contradiction to the high biodiversity values of the area. The great spotted kiwi and weka are both found here, along with the Avatar Moth, a species unknown anywhere else in the world, and only identified in 2012. It is also home to the Denniston skink, another species found nowhere else, and the giant snail Powelliphanta Patrickensis We consider this biodiverse area must be protected, not least from being stripped bare by a coal mine, which would likely render at least some of these species extinct. The Denniston plateau contains valuable wetland peatland areas found nowhere else. Not only should they be protected from coal mining, but we note the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan specifically points to a strategy of wetland and biodiversity protection as part of our climate strategy and to protect them as valuable carbon sinks. We recommend that the Denniston plateau component be declared a Scientific Reserve and that the remainder be classified as an ecological area. We also recommend that the Old Denniston School area be declared as an Historic Reserve (under Part 3, S18 Reserves Act) 🌏 3. KAW_26 - Ballarat Again, we find it odd the recommended classification is only "Conservation Park", given the “high landscape and ecological value” supporting “rare and distinct species.” We recommend that Conservation Area Ballarat be classified as an ecological area. Lastly, and importantly, we also make a wider recommendation that the Government changes our legislation covering these areas: the Reserves Act, the Conservation Act, and the National Parks Act, so they all honour and respect Te Tiriti O Waitangi - the Treaty of Waitangi. Such changes should reflect the rights of Māori to be able to access these areas for cultural purposes such as mahinga kai and medicinal plants for rongoā - without having to seek permission. Ngā mihi https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByRGSD_ijh4
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    Created by KASM - Kiwis Against Sea Bed Mining
  • Pass a Deforestation-Free Import law!
    The world’s forests are home for millions of indigenous people, they are the lungs of the planet - critical in the fight against climate change - and provide vital habitats for abundant wildlife. But forests are under threat from an insatiable industry that clears, burns, chips and mills to make way for plantations and to produce cheap goods. To make matters more urgent, deforestation itself is also a major driver of climate change, contributing 10 to 15 percent of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. SOLUTIONS EXIST The global community has solutions at hand to save global forests, but we must demand the political will from our Governments. The New Zealand Government can play a part by passing a law to ensure that products entering Aotearoa (including products the Government procures) are not contributing to the loss of the Earth's most precious forests. New Zealand has to crack down on imports of the most high-risk commodities such as palm oil, palm kernel, pulp and paper, soy, animal products (like beef and leather), cocoa, coffee, and rubber. Right now there is a political opportunity to strengthen New Zealand’s rules governing importation of forest products, but we must act quickly. 🌲 Be a forest champion and help save this planet for future generations. Sign and share our petition to pass a strong New Zealand law to fight deforestation!
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  • A Moratorium on Fishing of Long Finned Eel (Tuna) Needs to Be Implemented Immediately
    "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." - Mahatma Gandhi “Any threat to the eels are a threat to the identity and mana of the iwi and hapū who have a responsibility to protect them… It is outrageous that people are still catching them for profit.” - Sir Pita Sharples, 2013 "The Government must suspend the commercial catch of New Zealand's longfin eel, and accept the conclusion by Parliament's environment watchdog that the eel is on a path to extinction" - Green Party spokesperson for conservation and oceans & fisheries., Eugenie Sage, 2016 https://www.greens.org.nz/govt-must-act-longfin-eels-disappear "Killing a kererū - which is classified as "Near Threatened" - is punishable with a $100,000 fine, and/or up to two years in prison. Yet with the long finned eel - which is classified as "Endangered" – not only can recreational fishers legally take up to 6 day, but killing them is rewarded with somewhere between $10 and $20 per eel on the export market" - Charlie Mitchell, Environment Correspondent, Stuff, 2019 "https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/113450351/managed-to-extinction-are-we-at-risk-of-losing-our-creature-of-mystery "The concern among scientists is that freshwater eel numbers are declining to the point where populations will not possess the critical mass necessary to carry on migration and reproduction. In the 19th century, the North American population of passenger pigeons was estimated to be over six billion, representing 25 percent or more of the total avian biomass of the continent. Even though millions of passenger pigeons were being killed every year, it seemed the resource could never be exhausted. The species went extinct in 1914" -James Prosek, award winning author, artist and filmmaker, 2010 https://e360.yale.edu/features/a_steady_steep_decline_for_the_lowly_uncharismatic_eel "Tuna whakaheke deaths are disastrous for the future" - Hori Kingi, Ngā Kaitiāki o Ngā Wāimāori https://www.nzherald.co.nz/northern-advocate/news/eels-minced-by-hikurangi-swamp-pumps-dumped-at-council-offices/HIFOC2IWYHNGTM7ZV6E7MXFX4Y/ The long-finned eel (tuna) is endemic to New Zealand. It is an ancient species with a profound connection to our land and its people. It is an iconic and mythical species with an important place in the history and folklore of Māori - with a special traditional role as a spiritual protector of the land, nature and people - as much as the kiwi, kererū, tuatara, Hector's dolphin and the like. It is categorized by the Department of Conservation as "Declining - At Risk" and yet we are exporting as much as 100 tonnes of them per year as well as allowing recreational fishermen to fish them at will. The tuna is one of the largest eel species in the world. It was once very common in our waters; today, it is endangered, yet we continue to plunder it. The government has done little meaningful to protect the species, despite prior petitions being presented to them (in 2013). When in opposition, Labour and the Greens supported the proposal of this petition (a moratorium on commercial harvesting) yet when they were elected, little changed. The tuna is a noble, beautiful, mighty species of creature that deserves a place in the heart of every citizen, just as the kiwi and tuatara. They bring happiness to people when they can see and interact with them in the wild. At this rate, reserves like Ngā Manu will be the only place to see them, and eventually the species will be gone forever - exactly like what happened (almost) to the American bison and the passenger pigeon, both species which were annihilated from billions of individuals to extinction or near extinction by thoughtless greed in the space of a matter of decades. Surely we are better than that - I think most Kiwis would assume that we are, but our history, and current policies and attitudes with respect to this issue, puts those important values in serious question. The campaign acknowledges the kaitiaki status of mana whenua/local iwi to best look after tuna. Note that a member of the community representing Eel Activists Wairarapa has made a submission to parliament petitioning for the species of tuna to be granted absolute protection, in light of its endangered status. Please also consider signing this petition here https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/petitions/document/PET_113510/petition-of-david-famularo-protect-the-longfin-eeltuna Join the eel conservation Facebook group here https://www.facebook.com/groups/472729636842389/ I believe placing the tuna on the protected species list, like the kiwi, kea, native lizards, native dolphins, and so on, is ultimately the most desirable outcome, but the most urgent step is to place at least a temporary halt on its utterly unsustainable commercial exploitation. https://e360.yale.edu/features/a_steady_steep_decline_for_the_lowly_uncharismatic_eel https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/128521642/threatened-eels-still-being-harvested-for-food-renewing-call-for-commercial-fishing-ban https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/113954064/the-dams-the-science-and-the-tiny-industry-clinging-to-life?rm=a https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/82056650/pressure-to-ban-fishing-of-longfin-eels-rises-as-industry-faces-upheaval?rm=ahttps://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/69946047/eels-just-as-worthy-of-protections-as-kereru https://www.longfineel.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tuna-Kuwharuwharu-Longfin-Eel.pdf https://eel-activists-wairarapa.blogspot.com/ https://www.pce.parliament.nz/publications/on-a-pathway-to-extinction-an-investigation-into-the-status-and-management-of-the-longfin-eel http://www.longfineel.co.nz/extinction-crisis/ https://www.visitzealandia.com/Events/ArtMID/2271/ArticleID/272/Tunaeel-release-to-keep-population-thriving http://www.longfineel.co.nz/conservation/ https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/freshwater-fish/eels/
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    Created by Liam McMahon